How to Get Work as a Guest Entertainer on a Cruise Ship Part III

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This is part 3 on How to Get Work … and Keep it! … by working as a Guest
Entertainer on a cruise ship

Cue Sheets
Always have your cue sheets ready to give the production manager. These will
include any music cues and lighting cues. You will always get time to rehearse and
this will be the time to go over any cues. The stages on the ships today are
incredible and have everything.
Prepare cue sheets for light and sound technicians. Early upon your arrival on the
ship the stage manager will contact you. He or she will want to know what special
requirements you need and how much rehearsal time to schedule. You should be
familiar with your technical requirements. Talk to him about the kind of lighting and
sound you need and any backstage help you will require. At rehearsal you should be
able to supply written cue sheets that explain how and when all the technical things
happen during your act. For recorded music I use a programmable mini-disc unit. If
you use recorded music I recommend that you put it on the highest quality playback
method you can. If you use extensive and complex lighting, I recommend you bring
videotape of your act to show the lighting technician how you’d like it to look. Light
fixtures change from place to place, but the same mood and affect can be created
from various sources.

Live animals
Some acts do use live animals on ships, to do this you need to get pre-approved by
head office of the cruise line you are working for so they can sort out the paper
work well in advance. To travel with livestock is the responsibility of the Guest
Entertainer.

Theatre Conduct
It is important that you are familiar with stage deportment; how to enter, exit, and
take a curtain call. This is all part of professionalism, simple theatre 101. First
impressions matter, but never more than when you are on stage. During the first 30
seconds, your audience will size you up. They make judgments about you that will
color their attitudes about what you do. The first moments are critical. You need to
strategically decide how you will present yourself immediately upon your
introduction.

Likewise you should give careful consideration to the end of your act. How will you
finish? How will you exit the stage? Cruise ship shows all have emcees, so you will
be called back to the stage for a bow.

Usually, an act will finish their last routine and take a bow as the M.C. announces
the act’s name. The band will play a quick and bouncy piece of music as the
performer walks off stage. The emcee will then ask the audience to “call the
performer back,” with another round of applause. At this point the entertainer walks
back to the stage to receive the applause.

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